Courageous Conversations

 In Mental Health, NYCHC Events, Upcoming events, Women

According to NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, 1 in 5 U.S. adults experience mental illness each year. Whether you have a bleeding disorder, care for a loved one who has one, we recognize that you need a space to address their mental health challenges. We’re excited to introduce you to Courageous Conversations: a weekly chat to allow you to open up about your struggles, make connections, and feel supported.

Starting on Every Thursday at 7 PM, we’ll host this weekly series. Through conversation, exposure to skills, and guided meditations, the goal is for everyone to feel comfortable speaking up and asking for help, as well as raising general awareness of the subject. All community members are invited to participate.

Lisa’s Story

I never imagined that I’d get to a place where I would have the opportunity to lead others in conversations about mental health. One year ago, I voluntarily, with significant encouragement from my doctors, spent time in a mental health facility to help ease my deep depression and unwavering anxiety. My mind was overwhelmed in negativity, so much so that I didn’t see the point in living.

One year later, through consistent, challenging therapy, and finally a helpful medication, I am here with you today to tell you that I am healing.

I have returned to things I love including family, friends, and my career. I dedicate time to self-care and compassion, from yoga to baths, to simply saying good morning to myself. That has been a life changer.

In practice, I’m an educator. I have worked at a NYC private school for 16 years, teaching bright students who have learning disabilities in a 1:1 setting. We’re fortunate in that our sons, Max and Eli, 14, attend the same school.

At birth, the boys were diagnosed with severe hemophilia B. We knew it was in our cards, as my dad, who also had hemophilia B, led a life of suffering, eventually receiving a bad blood transfusion for factor treatment. Afflicted with the AIDS virus, he passed away when I was 12 and he was 45. I miss him every day.

My passion lies in helping others. I am an empath, sensitive to others, especially those dealing with mental health struggles. I devour reading, watching and listening to stories of others’ journeys through the tricky layers of mental wellbeing. I want to share what I’ve learned on my journey—what worked, what didn’t, and how I went from feeling suicidal to acceptance. This is why I wanted to team up with the New York City Hemophilia Chapter to launch Courageous Conversations. I hope you’ll join me.

Disclaimer – the material presented in this series is not an attempt to practice medicine or give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. The information contained in this site is for the sole purpose of being informative and is not to be considered complete, and does not cover all issues related to mental health. Moreover, this information should not replace consultation with your doctor.

Lisa, her husband Brad, and their two sons Max and Eli who both have severe hemophilia B.

Disclaimer – the material presented in this series is not an attempt to practice medicine or give specific medical advice, including, without limitation, advice concerning the topic of mental health. The information contained in this site is for the sole purpose of being informative and is not to be considered complete, and does not cover all issues related to mental health. Moreover, this information should not replace consultation with your doctor.

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